The Relationship Between Crystal Meth Rehab And Prescription Drug Addiction

crystalmethrelationshipA lot of people might be wondering if there is any reason for a crystal meth rehab to treat prescription drug addiction as well.  For use, that answer is a resounding, “You bet!”

Aside from drug addiction being largely irrelevant to the specific substance being used, the most common reason would be that the thing that led and addict to a crystal meth rehab program may have originally been their prescription drug addiction.

We have treated people who have tried to self-medicate to offset the side effects of medications they may have been prescribed.  For instance, if someone was diagnosed with ADD or ADHD, they might be prescribed Ritalin or Adderall. Both of these medications can be abused, and can cause some people to crash when their effects wear off.Some try to counter it by just sleeping it off or taking more to offset the crash (which, in the case of the latter, can be the start of a serious problem as well).

The peaks and valleys of crystal meth rehab and prescription drug addiction

However, there are also those who think to themselves, “Rather than have these huge peaks and valleys, I’d rather just stay on the peaks, and crystal meth will keep me there for a longer amount of time.”  No one thinks they will end up in some sort of crystal meth rehab program at the time, but more often than not, that’s where this path leads.

The reverse can often be true as well, though.  Take the drug Suboxone, for example.  Sometimes, Suboxone is used to treat someone suffering from opiate addiction to stave off the withdrawal. However, this does little more than trade one addiction for another.  Sure, the addict is not using heroin any longer, but they are also still not free from prescription drug addiction either.

In that case, the dependency works in the opposite direction, going from an addiction to street drugs to prescription drug addiction instead.

What is the point, though? Really? Isn’t someone still in the same position they were in before?  Aren’t their lives still controlled by their need for a drug?

Just because something is prescribed by a doctor or comes in pill form does not mean that it is inherently safe. Under the supervision of a qualified physician, yes, it becomes much safer, but that does not mean it is completely safe, especially if a person does not communicate with him or her.

That is the crux of the issue:  help from others.  Without the help from others, taking on something as big as prescription drug addiction could prove to be a much bigger obstacle down the line—if you get there. Of course, not everyone will, but, chances are, if you are reading this, then you or someone you love is in this very position right now.

If side effects are unbearable or similar to what you are already facing, then tell your doctor. Only he or she is qualified to determine whether or not your trip to the pharmacy could lead you far worse places later.

Leave a Comment