Addiction Relief

addiction reliefAddiction relief comes in many forms. If you are anything like I was, and you’re still coping with alcoholism and addiction, then you probably woke up a little hazy on the details of what happened last night (or very hazy—if not outright oblivious). If you’re an addict or alcoholic, here’s how my Halloween night would’ve happened.

First, it would’ve started the moment I woke up (if I was capable of sleeping), if not a few days early. After all, I needed to prepare for the night ahead. Middle of the week or not, it was my time to shine—to be the guy who everyone liked. At least, so I thought. Come mid-day, I’d be in a rough spot. Between lunch and work/school ending, I’d be worthless, but magically find a second wind after it was time to go home.

From here, the night would go one of two ways.

The first way was the most likely, and I’d go home, keep my buzz going, and wait for everyone to figure out what was going on. By the time it was figured out, either I was incapable of doing anything because I’d drank and used throughout the day, or, eventually, people just wouldn’t want me there. I’d then hole up in my room, alone, and watch some 70’s or 80’s B-horror movie; or I’d attempt to play videogames. By this time, though, it’d be a challenge to lift the remote, let alone constantly press buttons in any organized way. I’d eventually pass out, and wonder why no one wanted me around.

Here’ the second way things would happen, and not coincidentally, why the first outcome became more common. They’d figure out what to do, and I’d either meet them or have them pick me up. I’d maybe or maybe not vomit in the car on the way. I’d maybe or maybe not threaten people in other cars. Regardless, I’d shake it off when we arrived, and I’d plop down on any available seat. 90% of the time, if there was no police intervention, I’d stay right there the rest of the night.

Part of the reason was I couldn’t physically get up, but the other part was I could drink and use more. However, as I did that, I’d get belligerent. About 80% of the time, I’d trash talk whomever would be there; there was never a reason really besides opportunity. The other 20% I’d either spend hitting on some girl I’d never met right from the start, or I’d hit on someone’s girlfriend. Usually, it’d be the latter. In all fairness, I usually didn’t know the girlfriend was seeing anyone, but even when I did, it never stopped me.

In any event, eventually, I’d be asked/forced to leave. That’d generally mean one of my friends would have to take me, since cabs were not a timely way of taking me away from an inevitable beating. We’d drive past families and trick-or-treaters on the way, I’d get depressed and wonder where it all went wrong, and ask why no one liked me. The pity-pot would end abruptly with a sudden urge to: a) pee, b) vomit, or c) both. I’d say about 70% of the time, it made it out of the car in time. I’d feel refreshed in either event, and demand to go back. Instead, that person would keep on course, and would drop me off at my house, where I’d stumble up the stairs. Then, I’d pass out on my bed and do my best to keep at least one foot on the ground to somewhat control the spinning of the room.

In other words, it was no different than any other night, aside from kids going door-to-door asking for candy.

Relate? Addiction Relief Is Possible

Draw whatever conclusions you may, but incidentally, since finding recovery and subsequent addiction relief, I haven’t had a night like that in a long time. If you relate at all to any of that—just saying—consider calling us.

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