Marijuana in CO Schools After Legalization Explodes

marijuana in CO schoolsThe problem with marijuana in CO school after legalization has increased exponentially.

One officer has reported that even more children, at increasingly younger ages with increasingly larger quantities of the drug, are bringing the drug to school.

Although there are no solid figures, since school disciplinary records do not isolate marijuana from other drug violations in schools, school faculty are reporting huge increases in the numbers of middle and high school students bringing pot on campus.

Officials are claiming that this increase is directly related to the changing culture in CO regarding both recreational and medicinal marijuana. School employees are also noting a growing nonchalance with bringing the drug on campus, seemingly unaware that any disciplinary action could potentially take place.

Some leave campus to smoke at nearby parks, and return to school reeking of the drug. In the past, this was a telltale sign of marijuana and drug addiction—that a student could not go throughout the day without needing to use the drug.

This change in culture occurs not just directly with the children, but also with the parents. It is believed that with the relaxed laws on parents, their own rules and behaviors surrounding the drug have also relaxed. It is believed that some—if not most—of these kids are simply grabbing their parents’ stash after it has been left out or just not hidden as well.

Despite being forbidden for those under the age of 21, officials, parents, and the public at large are troubled with the increase in accessibility amongst children. However, this should come as absolutely no surprise. When access is increased, it is increased to all people—not just those who are deemed appropriate users.

This trend is also growing on a national level, but with the recreational legalization of marijuana in Colorado and Washington, those two states are being used as the litmus test for more comprehensive marijuana reform.

That there is any surprise that there would be a problem with marijuana in Colorado schools after legalization is absurd. It was the biggest and perhaps most loudly vocalized concern from opponents of the law. The public was assured by supporters that the substance would b highly regulated, and that there would be no negative consequences.

However, this methodology is unsettlingly similar to that of a drug addict’s. The addict methodology is to tell anyone and everyone exactly what they want to hear in order to get what the addict wants. The public wanted the reassurances that there would be no negative consequences to legalizing marijuana, and the advocates jumped on board without hesitation.

Perhaps most disturbingly, though, is that this legislation was not introduced and voted into law by kids—it was introduced and voted in by their parents and other adults, primarily concerned with their own use.

Your thoughts on marijuana in CO schools?

What do you think? Has this legal experiment failed already? Should we be surprised about the growing problem of marijuana in CO schools after legalization? Let us know in the comments!

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